New Orleans – Part Two

Prologue:

In case you haven’t heard, New Orleans got smashed by Hurricane Ida, on August 29.  In fact, Ida careened into Louisiana 16 years, to the day, after Hurricane Katrina obliterated much of New Orleans.  Tough times are ahead for everyone in southern Louisiana and Mississippi.  I remember the mass exodus, after Katrina.  I made some new friends, as they made their way north, to the Memphis area.  Many of those people returned to New Orleans and Biloxi to rebuild their homes and communities, after many months,  and now, they have an opportunity to prove their mettle, once again. 

Stay strong, friends.

Way back, at least it seems like ‘way back’ to me now, in May, 2021, my wife and I made a trip to New Orleans.  We had spent most of 2020 confined by Covid-19 and, after receiving our vaccinations, we needed to break away.  We spent 4 days and 3 nights in New Orleans, just as the city was lifting some of the Covid restrictions.  We had a blast.  You can see my first blog about this experience here

Here’s some of my recollections from our second day, in the fabulous Crescent City, New Orleans.

Café Du Monde

You’ve got to wake up early in the morning if you want to beat the masses that head to Café Du Monde on any given day.  I mean really early!  Café Du Monde, located in New Orleans’ French Market, which of course is in the French Quarter, is open 24 hours a day.  That’s pretty impressive, considering that mostly serve beignets and coffee! 

How can a café survive with such a limited menu?  You only need to sample their beignets and chicory coffee to understand. Simplicity is divine, especially when the simple things are done right!

Everything you might want is within walking distance, in the French Quarter.  Every stroll unveils interesting shops and eateries.  All sorts of shops, restaurants and hotels can be found on nearly every street.  I was expecting a tourist trap but I was surprised to see a pleasant balance of locals and tourists on the streets and in the stores. 

The Market Café

Dining al fresco might be the best way to enjoy the New Orleans experience.  The sights, the music and the aroma of New Orleans is a treat for the senses.  The Market Café has some indoor dining but most of the seating is outdoors, on the covered patio that wraps around the building. 

We stopped by for an early lunch and I’m glad we arrived before noon.  We waited about twenty minutes to be seated.  By the time we finished our meal, the line was doubled and I imaged that people waited for nearly an hour, to be seated.

The menu at the Market Café is moderately priced and the food and service was worth every penny. 

AWESOME ROAST BEEF PO’ BOY!

I had a difficult time deciding what to try, because I wanted to try everything!  I opted for small cups of Gumbo, Jambalaya, Shrimp Creole, and Red Beans and Rice.  All four bowls were rich and delicious but the shrimp creole was outstanding.  Based on the color and velvety thickness of the sauce, I would call it etoufee, either way, it was full of flavor and very satisfying.

WHEN IN DOUBT, SAMPLE THEM ALL!

As we walked back to our hotel, we came across a Mexican restaurant. I stopped to look at the menu and I thought it might be a good place to visit for dinner.  After our rest, I visited the bar at our hotel.  Patrick’s Bar Vin showcased several types of wine and the proprietor, Patrick, was chatting with some of the regular customers.  I went to the bar to check out the beers, on tap.  Among the regular, expected variety I noticed two Belgium beers, Le Chouffe and Chimay.  I tried one of each and was impressed with the Chimay.  Each pint cost about $9.00, so I sipped them thoughtfully.  While I was there, I struck up a conversation with the bartender and, during the conversation, I learned that he was from Honduras so, naturally, I had to talk about my Tex-Mex roots and  I eventually asked him about the Mexican restaurant that I had seen on my way back to the hotel.  He said that the restaurant was overpriced and the menu was all over the place, which made him feel that the restaurant lacked focus.  He said that if I wanted authentic Mexican cuisine, I should go to Cuñada, which was only a few blocks away from the hotel.  He said that Cuñada was a family owned business, and served authentic Oaxacan food.  I took his advice and was glad I did!

PATRICK’S BAR VIN – BIENVILLE STREET

Cuñada – Conti Street

For a split second, I thought, “Why am I going to a Mexican restaurant in the New Orleans French Quarter?”  I regained my senses and remembered that great Mexican food can be found just about anywhere in U.S., and, more importantly, New Orleans has such a diverse mixture of cultures.  It’s what makes New Orleans, New Orleans.  African-American, Spanish and French influences are woven together, like a beautiful tapestry. 

I felt at home during our visit to Cuñada.  The aroma of beans and spices filled the air as we walked inside. The simple décor and the busy staff members made me think that their emphasis was on the quality of the food.  That proved to be true.

The brilliant colors that might have been missing from the restaurant décor, so popular with Mexican restaurants, were found in the plates of food they served. 

We started with queso fundido, which translates to “melted cheese”.  It is a dip served with crisp or soft corn tortillas. 

This version included five types of melting cheese, Chihuahua, Oaxaca, queso blanco, Monterrey Jack, and asadero queso frescal.  Pork chorizo was added, as well as roasted poblano chiles and cilantro.  The different kinds of cheese were not mixed together, before baking on the cast iron skillet, which gave the dish a nice variety of textures and flavors.  That quality made this a standout version of queso fundido!

My wife ordered enchiladas rojas.  The cucumber, radishes, pickled onions and avocado was a feast for the eyes and the rich red sauce had an earthy tone, with just a little heat from the chilis. 

I ordered fish tacos, prepared two ways.  One was a beer battered fish taco and the other was pan fried.  Both were accompanied by all of the colorful vegetables.  I was glad to see that they prepared the rice in the classic, Oaxacan fashion.  Corn, peas, carrots and a pinch of cilantro turns rice into something special. 

It was the simple bean soup that won my heart.  The beans look so innocent, surrounded by all of the colorful food but those beans were outstanding!  The bean broth was full of mild flavors.  I closed my eyes and concentrated on the flavors, trying to piece together the different spices that went into the soup. 

It wasn’t until we got up to leave that I realized what was in the soup that made me feel so good.  There, hanging from the vent hoods, over the grill, were several bunches of epazote.  That’s the mark of authentic Oaxacan cuisine! 

I’m usually not shy about asking to take a trip back to the kitchen in a restaurant, but this galley styled kitchen was tight and the cooks and staff were dancing deftly around each other, hard at work.  Not a good time to assert myself, I thought.  At the heart of the kitchen was the person I knew would be there.  Grandma.  Grandma was laying out a round of fresh corn tortillas on the grill and she looked tired.  I shouted loud enough for her to hear, “Tengo much gusto!  Gracias!”, which basically means, “I so happy, thank you”.  She raised her head to look at me and seemed bewildered.  I gave her a wink and we left.

30 Minute Marina, Rigatoni (No Baloney)

Well, tomato season is coming to close.  My garden has been extremely nice to me this year, despite my lack of attention to it.  If it wasn’t for the vigilance and diligence of my wife, we would have piles of rotten tomatoes lying beneath the vines, instead of the bountiful harvest that we have enjoyed. 

Way back in April, when I finished planting the garden, I whispered a solemn promise to the garden, “You’re on your own, now.”  It was the least I could do.  I knew that my job was going to demand much of my time for the months to come and, as it turned out, I was right.  Working nine to ten hours each day, six days a week leaves only a slender slice of time to do anything other than eat and sleep. 

  • ‘Essential Worker’ was the phrase used last year, to describe me and my fellow coworkers.  Now that we are 20 months into this pandemic, I don’t hear that moniker spoken very often, as it relates to my industry.  The real essential workers, the ones who are saving lives and feeding us, are still out there, doing their best, day after day.  ‘Pseudo Essential Workers’, like me, are supplying the world with small kitchen appliances are dealing with supply chain failures and a rocky economy. 

We’ve had ample rain and sun over the last several months and the garden heeded my whispered curse.  Our twenty tomato plants put out about 25 gallons of Roma and Beefsteak tomatoes.  We’ve canned about two dozen quarts of marina and salsa and we’ve had buckets and buckets of cherry tomatoes, to spare.

So, now it’s a Thursday and I’m staring at a bowl of late-season tomatoes on the kitchen counter.

Let’s make a quick marina and figure out how to make a meal of it.

Ingredients:

8 to 10 medium tomatoes.  (I used 8 inexplicably large Roma tomatoes)

5 or 6 fresh basil leaves, chopped

A sprig of fresh rosemary, stripped and chopped

1 Tbs garlic powder

2 tsp dried thyme

2 tsp dried oregano

Directions:

Rough chop the tomatoes.

Put the tomatoes in a large sauce pot.

Set the heat to medium/high.  Stir every few minutes.

In between stirs, consider other food items on hand and how they could be put together in a sensible way.

Let’s see…I have a large, whole pork loin.  Check.  I have half a 16 ounce bag of Rigatoni pasta.  Check.  I have about 6 ounces of Parmesan cheese.  Check.  I have a head of broccoli.  Check. 

It’s a four pound pork loin.  I’m not going to use all of that!  I want to serve 3 to 4 people so, maybe I’ll use half of the Rigatoni and save the rest for another day.  1 head of broccoli…perfect.  I will use all of that. 

Stir the tomatoes!  Gee whiz, I almost forgot!

Now, what am I going to do with the pork loin?  I’ll use about one and half pounds and cut it into ½” thick slices.  I can coat the slices with Panko breadcrumbs and pan fry it.  Yeah, that shouldn’t take very long to cook. 

I’ll boil 8 ounces of the rigatoni and add it to a platter, top it with some marinara, top that with the fried pork and top that with more marina and top the whole thing with Parmesan cheese.  Yes. 

This is definitely starting to sound like an Italian dish, but for the life of me, I don’t know if it’s really an Italian dish, or if I’m just pretending.  I guess it doesn’t matter.  What should I do with the broccoli?

Stir the tomatoes!  I didn’t forget this time!

OK.  Broccoli.  What if I steam the broccoli and add some Italian dressing to the boiling water so that it will flavor the broccoli, as it steams.  Yeah, that sounds like a thing!

Ingredients: (Now that I have figured out how to complete the meal!)

1 ½ lbs. pork loin, sliced into ½” thick slices

2 Tbs cornstarch

Black pepper, to taste

8 ounces Rigatoni pasta

2 eggs, beaten

1 cup Panko breadcrumbs

6 ounces Parmesan cheese, shredded

1 head of broccoli, chopped

3 tablespoons Italian salad dressing

The tomatoes are cooking down nicely.  They have been bubbling for about 15 minutes and the sauce looks very thin.  Maybe I’d better add 8 ounces of tomato paste, to stiffen the sauce. 

I’d better chop the basil and rosemary.  I need to add the spices and herbs to the sauce and let it simmer, while I prepare the pork.

OK.  Herbs and spices are in the pot.  Good.  Now, let it go at medium/low heat for another 10 minutes.  Step up the stirring to once per minutes, otherwise the thick sauce will sputter and splatter and get all over my stovetop!

I’ll slice the pork now and set up a dredging station.  Slice the pork and coat with cornstarch and a little black pepper.  Egg, and Panko breadcrumbs are all I need for dredging station.

Stir the sauce!

I’m going to bring out the skillet and add about ½ inch of oil to it and turn the heat to medium. 

Dip the pork in egg, knock off excess egg, press both sides of the pork in Panko breadcrumbs and set aside.  Good.

Stir the sauce again.  It’s been simmering for about 15 minutes and it looks thick now.  I think I can take it off the heat and put in a bowl. 

Rinse the pot out with water and fill it about half way with water and add some salt.  Set the pot on the stove and turn the heat to high.  Once the water boils, add the rigatoni.  Cook until al dente, maybe 15 minutes.

While the pasta cooks, I’ll grab the head of broccoli and cut it into florets.  These are going to go into the big pot, after the pasta is done.

The skillet is hot and the pork is ready to be cooked.  Yay.  Add the pork to the pan and avoid overcrowding the pan.  Cook at medium/high heat for about two minutes on each side.  Remove to a paper towel-line plate.

Remove the rigatoni from the pot and spread it out, across a large platter. 

Rinse out the pot again and add about ½ inch of water, and add about 3 tablespoons of Italian dressing.  Turn the heat to low/medium.  Put the cut broccoli in a colander and set the colander over the pot.  Put the lid on the pot and let the broccoli steam for about 10 minutes.

While the broccoli steams, top the pasta with some of the marina.  Add the fried, breaded, pork slices.  Add another layer of marinara.

Oh, come on!  I always forget the cheese!  I’ll quickly shred the Parmesan cheese and sprinkle it on top of the platter.

Pull the broccoli from steamer and place in a serving bowl.

There!  Dinner is ready in less than an hour.  Whew!

Epilogue: On a serious note, if you haven’t received the vaccine, please get it.  A virus like, Covid-19, will continue to spread and mutate, if it is allowed to.  Don’t allow fear or stubbornness to keep you from saving humanity. 

Expect an expert excerpt

A few weeks ago, I was on the phone, chatting it up with my parents and I mentioned that I was in the midst of preparing dinner. They wanted to see some pictures, so I obliged, the next day.

Here’s an excerpt from the e-mail that I sent, along with some photos.

Note: I mention swai and tilapia in the message. The two types of fish have become very common in grocery stores across the U.S., and maybe the rest of the world. They are not the same fish, as some might think.

Okay, on to dinner…

The fish was Swai, which is some sort of large white fish…maybe it’s like Tilapia, the other white fish that is so ubiquitous in grocery stores nowadays.  I dusted the fish and shrimp with cumin and cayenne powder and pan fried them for a few minutes. 

The accoutrements were guacamole, sliced red onion, mango, a salad consisting of chopped Romaine lettuce, bell pepper and green onion, and a creamy sauce that contained mayonnaise, sour cream, cocktail sauce, hot sauce, garlic salt and a dash of Maggi seasoning.  If you haven’t used Maggi seasoning, it’s worth trying…it’s like concentrated soy sauce, sort of.  A little bit goes a long way!  All of this was loaded into a burrito-sized flour tortilla.

You’ll probably notice the chilis with the seafood.  Fear not!  Nobody ate these.  They were strictly ornamental, although I considered eating the habaneros, but I knew I needed to hit the sack within an hour after dinner and I didn’t want to sleep with spicy chilis in me.

Alrighty, there you have it.  I wish you could have been here to join in the fun!

Love,

Bob

Kung Pao(ish) Chicken

宫保鸡丁 (ish)

Kung Pao Chicken is an American Chinese Restaurant staple and I’ve had many variations.  Kung Pao Chicken is one those versatile recipes that can be interpreted in many ways.

After a little research, I found that an authentic Kung Pao sauce is made with lychee, a tropical fruit, which I think looks a little like a sea urchin.  You can decide for yourself.

I’m just a home cook and I rarely go out of my way to find exotic ingredients.  I tend to look inside my pantry and find things that can substitute “authentic” elements for a recipe.  Sichuan cuisine is all about umami, the stimulating flavor of sweet, sour, acid and spice.  I combine a variety of common elements to achieve the umami sensation, and that’s exactly what I did for this dish.  It’s not authentic but, I attempted to stay true to the spirit of the dish.  It’s just me, putting things together in a thoughtful way, just like any good home cook would do.

Sauce Ingredients:

4 Thai chilis, remove seeds and reserve.  Reserve chilis for the stir fry.

1 inch fresh ginger, thinly sliced

3 garlic cloves, mashed

1 Tbs cooking oil

¼ cup dark soy sauce

1 Tbs soy sauce

1 Tbs peanut butter

1 Tbs sambal oelek garlic chili sauce

1 Tbs molasses (or Hoisin sauce)

1 tsp sesame oil 

2 tsp cornstarch

1 Tbs. vinegar

2 Tbs water

1 tsp sugar

Stir-Fry Ingredients:

8 ounces of dry Asian noodles

1 Tbs cooking oil

1 pound boneless skinless chicken things, cut into bite-sized pieces

2 Tbs cornstarch (or rice starch)

3 celery stalks, cut into bite-sized pieces

2 large carrots, diagonally sliced into ¼” thick

1 medium yellow or white onion, Julienne sliced

1” piece of ginger, cut into small matchstick-sized pieces

1 ½ cups roasted peanuts (salted or unsalted – I used sweet chili roasted peanuts)

2 Tbs toasted sesame seeds

3 green onions, chopped

½ cup fresh cilantro leaves

Directions:

Prepare the sauce.  Cut the chilis in half, lengthwise, and remove the seeds.  Separate the seeds and set aside.  Slice the ginger and chop the garlic.  Set these aside.   

Add the dark soy sauce, soy sauce, peanut butter, garlic chili sauce, molasses (or Hoisin sauce), sesame oil, sugar and vinegar to a bowl. 

Heat a large skillet low heat.  Add a teaspoon of oil.  Once the oil is hot, add the seeds from the chilis.  Allow the seeds to simmer in the oil until they begin to pop and become light brown. 

Add the ginger and garlic and heat for another two minutes, while stirring.  If the garlic starts to burn, remove it and discard the pieces of garlic. 

Pour the sauce ingredients into the skillet and simmer at low heat.  Whisk to blend the sauce.  In a small bowl, add the water and cornstarch.  Stir with a fork until the cornstarch forms a paste. Add the cornstarch past to the sauce and turn the heat to medium.  Whisk the sauce until it bubbles and thickens.

Strain sauce into a large bowl.  Discard the solid pieces and set the sauce aside.

Boil the noodles until they are al dente.  Strain, drizzle a little sesame oil over the noodles and toss to combine. Set aside until ready to use.

Prepare the vegetables and sort them on a large platter.  Set aside. 

Cut the chicken thighs into bite-sized pieces.  Sprinkle with cornstarch and toss is in a bowl to coat.  Let the chicken rest for a few minutes while you prepare the wok.

Heat a wok to medium/high heat.  Add a tablespoon of oil.  Add the pieces of chicken, a few at a time, to the wok.  Allow the chicken to fry without stirring for about one minute and then stir with a spatula until the chicken is light, golden brown.  Remove the chicken to a bowl and set aside.

Turn the heat down to medium/low heat.  Add the celery, carrots and onion.  Stir fry for a few minutes.  When the carrot starts to soften, add the prepared ginger.  Stir over medium heat for another minute. Add the Thai chilis, if you want to bring the heat!

Add the prepared sauce.  Mix with a spatula.

Add the chicken and continue to stir for a minute, or two. 

Add the peanuts.  Stir to combine.

Add some of the green onion and stir briefly.

Add the prepared noodles and toss.

Turn off the heat and transfer everything to a large bowl.

Garnish serving bowls with cilantro, green onion and toasted sesame seeds.

Sabrosa Carne Asada con Brisket

Just a quick post to let everyone know that I haven’t fallen off the edge of the earth!

Inspiration has been in short supply for the last several weeks.  Too much work and not enough play, I suppose.  I need to remedy that!

Today’s menu is inspired by  Carne Asada, which translates to grilled meat.  Sabrosa simply means tasty.  So this is a tasty carne asada with beef brisket.  Carne asada can be found in all of the Latin American countries.  The choice of meat varies, region by region.  The carne asada of my youth was a Tex-Mex version, usually made with marinated skirt steak, grilled over high heat, to produce of wonderful char on the meat.

Today’s carne asada is a result of looking for ways to use leftover smoked brisket.  The ten pound brisket provide my family with several meals, most of which were centered around warm slices of soft, smoky beef, covered with homemade barbecue sauce, but this time I changed things up a bit.

No recipe, this time, except to say that I sautéed onion, garlic and tomatoes and I charred a few jalapeños in a skillet.  I smothered the brisket with the vegetables and served it family style.  Black beans and warm, soft, corn tortillas finished the deal.

Enjoy life.  Spend time with friends and family.  Savor every moment!

Savory Orange Glazed Pork Chops

I like versatile recipes, such as this one.  Many of the components in this recipe can be substituted with other items.  Apricot jam can be replaced by orange marmalade or apple jelly.  I guess you could even use grape jelly or plum jelly.  Pork chops can be replaced by chicken breasts, thighs or legs, with or without bones.  Mustard can be any type you like, or you could use horseradish.  Use any combination of herbs that you happen to have, dry or fresh.  Grapefruit could replace oranges, etcetera. 

Substitutions allow this recipe to become whatever you want it to be, within reason.  Just don’t lose sight of the concept of sweet and savory. 

A sweet and savory dish should contain certain flavor elements.  Choose a fruit that is sweet but also a little tart.  Include herbs that are fragrant and rustic.  Add something with a sharp, pungent flavor, like mustard, and you are on the right path. 

Any time I use substitutions in a recipe I take a moment to consider if the various elements will be harmonious and, most importantly, I taste as I go.  I will taste a sauce before adding it to the rest of the dish, even if that means cutting off a small piece of the cooked meat and dipping it in the sauce, to sample the flavor. 

Ingredients:

Juice from 2 oranges

2 Tbs apricot jam

1 Tbs Dijon mustard (or whole grain mustard)

1 Tbs soy sauce

1/2 tsp hot sauce

2 Tbs cooking oil

1 Tbs butter

4 pork chops (boneless or with bones)

A pinch of salt and black pepper

2 or 3 sprigs of fresh rosemary

2 sprigs of fresh thyme

1 tsp garlic powder

1 tsp sage

1 onion, julienne cut

1 bell pepper, sliced thin

¼ cup orange zest

Juice of 1 lemon

Directions:

Add orange juice, apricot jam, soy sauce, hot sauce and mustard to a saucepan and cook over medium heat.  Stir to combine and keep stirring until it begins to bubble and boil.  Reduce heat and simmer for another 10 minutes.  Set sauce aside.

Heat a large oven-proof skillet over high heat.  Add two tablespoons of cooking oil to coat the pan.  Sprinkle salt and pepper over the pork chops.  Add the pork chops to  the hot pan. Add a tablespoon of butter to the pan. Sear the chops on both sides until they are browned. 

Add onion and bell pepper to the pan. 

Squeeze the juice from one half orange over the pork chops.

Add the prepared sauce.

Add the herbs and spices.

Add the orange zest.

Mix to combine and simmer at medium heat for 15 minutes.

Bake in the oven at 425° for 10 minutes.  (20 minutes if using bone-in chops)

Remove from the oven and add lemon juice.

Spoon cooked rice on a serving platter, leaving a well for the pork chops.

Arrange the pork chops on top of the rice and garnish with fresh rosemary.

New Orleans – Day One

As a first time visitor to New Orleans French Quarter, I didn’t know exactly what to expect I would see and discover.  Sure, I knew about Bourbon street, famous for Mardi Gras celebrations and I knew there would be plenty of restaurants and pubs to visit but, I was amazed at how accessible all of these places were. 

Walking is the best mode of transportation in the French Quarter. The French Quarter is a compact ward of the city and every street is full of a variety of restaurants, bars and boutiques.  A twenty-minute stroll can lead to world of discoveries.

We checked into our hotel in the late afternoon and, after a few minutes of rest, we were hungry and ready to find our first meal.  We walked out of the hotel lobby and one minute later, we found ourselves at Curio, a bistro and bar on the corner or Royal Street and Bienville Street.

Curio has the French, Spanish and Caribbean architectural style that nearly all of the buildings in the French Quarter share, which means lots of ornate iron work and multiple floors of covered galleries facing the streets.

Curio serves up typical American fare, embellished with Creole flair.

Our waiter, Dylan, was cordial and enthusiastic.  He guided us through some of the items on the menu and steered us toward some excellent options. 

French Onion Soup Au Gratin

$9.00

Caramelized Onion, Rich Beef Broth, Swiss & Provolone

The standout was the French Onion Soup Au Gratin.  My wife and I share this and we might have been happy to split another one amongst us because it was really that good.  There was nothing fancy or trendy about the French Onion Soup.  What made it so outstanding was its richness.  The beef stock was rich and smooth and full of flavors that can only be achieved by a slow process of reduction.  The caramelized onions added the perfect amount of sweetness to the soup.  The broiled cheese that topped the soup was perfectly melted and had just the right stringiness to make it fun to eat, but not messy.

Blue Crab Cakes

$14.00

Louisiana Blue Crab Meat, Onions & Peppers, Creole Coleslaw, Cilantro-Lime Mayo

This was my first experience with blue crabs from the Gulf of Mexico.  It is likely that the crabs actually came from Lake Pontchartrain, which is actually a large brackish estuary in southeastern Louisiana. 

I don’t have crab cakes very often but I know good crab cakes when I eat them.  Good crab cakes need to be full of sweet crab meat and they need to be seared perfectly, to achieve a crisp but yielding outer crust.  The crab cakes at Curio are very good and the cilantro-lime mayo dressing was a refreshing change of pace from the more typical remoulade sauce, or tartar sauce that is prevalent on the East coast. 

As good as these were, they rank number two on my crab cake experiences.  Number one came from a restaurant in Richmond, Virginia, some years ago.  It was a combination of the superior Chesapeake Bay blue crabs and the skilled chef that made them earned them top prize.

Coriander Blackened Redfish

Honey Creamed Mustard Greens

$26.00

Locally sourced redfish is plentiful in Louisiana.  Most are caught in the Gulf but redfish also find their way into Lake Ponchartrain.  Blackened redfish was developed by famed chef, Paul Prudhomme, right here, in the New Orleans French Quarter, nearly forty years ago. 

Blackening fish is a brave yet counterintuitive method of pan frying fish.  Paul Prudhomme’s genius shines brightly through this inventive preparation.  The fish filet is heavily dusted with seasonings and then quickly pan fried in butter at high heat. The result is a very aromatic fish, smoky to the nose, but not overly spicy.  The highlight of the fish I had at Curio was the emphasis on cumin, in the spice mix.  Cumin, when charred, adds a whole new depth of flavor.  The fish sat atop rich, creamy mustard greens.  Time could have stopped while I was eating this and that would have been just fine, with me.  I like big, bold flavors in nearly everything I eat and this redfish satisfied me in every way. 

Grilled Chicken Caprese Sandwich

$17.00

Fresh Mozzarella, Marinated Chicken, Basil Pesto, Tomato, Balsamic, Toasted Brioche Bun

My wife order the Chicken Caprese Sandwich.  She noted that the chicken was moist and tender and the Mozzarella, tomato and basil caprese was very fresh but the star of the sandwich was the delicious brioche bun. 

One of the nicest things about our experience at Curio was our timing.  We arrived in the late afternoon, when the dinner crowd was just beginning to arrive and, after a leisurely meal, we returned to our hotel before the raucous crowds packed the streets and bars.  We dined al fresco, on the second floor gallery.  The temperature was nearly perfect.  We were still a few hours away from sunset and a gentle breeze made the moment even better.  We sat and talked and looked down at the streets below, observing the crowds below. This was a very nice way to start our New Orleans experience.

25¢

Some grocery store deals are just too good to pass up. 

Last weekend, when I purchased a 10 pound brisket, (at $9.00 per pound), I found a bin full of large, red bell peppers on sale for 25 cents, each.  Red bell peppers usually sell for $1.00 each, or more!  Needless to say, I scooped up six of the bell peppers before leaving the store.

I imagine that the bell peppers were at reduced price because their shelf-life was expiring.  A few of the peppers had slight wrinkles but, for the most part, they looked very good.

Since I suspected that the peppers were nearing the end of their freshness, I decided to roast them and save them for later use. 

Once I pulled the brisket off of the smoker, I laid the peppers on the hot coals.  I turned the peppers over, after 15 minutes, and then again, nearly a half hour later.  I had forgotten about them while we were eating the brisket. 

Once I peeled the charred flesh from the peppers, and discarded the seeds and membranes, I still had a lot of usable smoked peppers.

I rinsed them under cold water and stored them in the refrigerator.  I have been using them in all sorts of meals.  Nachos, burritos, salads…you name it.  Roasted bell peppers are awesome, and, at 25 cents each, it was steal!

In a strange way, I felt justified for buying the $100 brisket because of the incredible savings on the peppers. 

And, as for the brisket, we have had 5 meals from it so far, with another 5 pounds left in the refrigerator.  Beef is pricey right now, but the secret lies in how it is used. 

Top a salad with a few slices of brisket.  Top a baked potato with brisket and barbecue sauce.  Make a hoagie with a little brisket and lots of sliced vegetables.  Add a slice of brisket to an egg breakfast, instead of bacon.  In other words, stretch the heck out of the purchase!

Don’t be cheap on yourself or your family.  Be smart!

Bon appétit!

Smokin’ !

It’s been two weeks since my wife and I returned from our 4-day trip to New Orleans and I still haven’t managed to submit a post about the adventure.  I think I’m still reeling from the experience and, even though the trip is still fresh in my mind, I’m finding it difficult to write about.   We had a wonderful time in New Orleans.  It’s a fantastic city with so much to offer.  I’m sure I will find time to share the details…someday!

Today was devoted to the joy of barbecue and smoking a brisket.  I try to make smoked brisket at least once a year and it’s always worth the effort.

Smoking a brisket is no easy feat, at least for me.  It takes between 12 to 16 hours to cook, which makes for a very long day.  I started this morning at 3:30 with a cup of chicory coffee, warmed up from yesterday’s cold pot.   Outdoor temperature was about 80° but the humidity was near 100°!  It was so humid that the newspaper I used for the charcoal chimney starter was limp and soggy by the time I was putting a match to it.  It took 3 attempts and about 30 minutes just to light the coals!

I bought a new offset smoker yesterday and I decided to break it in with a brisket.  I didn’t know if I was being foolish or confident.  Fortunately, the brisket came out just fine. 

By 4:00 p.m. I was pulling off the cooked brisket and life was good. 

We served the brisket with homemade Texas-style barbecue sauce, potato salad and a refreshing cucumber salad.  And for desert, homemade cheesecake, compliments of my wife.

This was the sort of Sunday meal that will keep me inspired throughout the upcoming work week!